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A storied career, a lifetime of laughs and serious leading male roles, a teary eyed Ernest Borgnine stood on the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards stage today and accepted the SCreen Actor's Guild (SAG’s) highest honor in the Lifetime Achievement Award. A well-deserved award, perhaps long overdue. From Here to Eternity, Marty, McHale's Navy and All Dogs Go To Heaven 2 are among the phenomenal 200 films with his credit dating back to 1951.


In Mr. Borgnine’s autobiography Ernie (Citadel Press

Good Starring Viggo Mortensen, Jason Isaacs, Jodie Whittaker
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The excellent performances by Viggo Mortensen (Hidalgo, Eastern Promises, Lord Of The Rings), and Jason Isaacs (Harry Potter, The Patriot, Peter Pan), in the 2008 film Good was Academy Award winning level. This seems to be one of those films that despite the level of talent displayed by the director, cinematographer, costuming and talent, the film did not get its day in the world of awards nominations. Truly astonishing given the beautiful cinematography by Andrew Dunn (Extraordiary Measures

Alatriste starring Viggo Mortensen
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Captain Alatriste: A flawless performance from Spanish director-writer Agustin Diaz Yanes on every level: cinematography, talent, editing, sound. Perhaps, the incredible original score by Roque Banos revels the director's accomplished hand in a particular way. The film is in Spanish with English subtitles. However, the music perhaps more than other elements made the entire experience universal, because the director carried every beat across cultures through the score.


It is an unfortunate set
Feminist Film Theorists: Laura Mulvey, Kaja Silverman, Teresa de Lauretis, Barbara Creed
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Whether you agree with any of the major feminist film theorists or not, the new book Feminist Film Theorists: Laura Mulvey, Kara Silverman, Teresa De Lauretis, Barbara Creed written by Shohini Chaudhuri (2006) spurs discussion on a wide range of issues in film. From Mulvey’s “male gaze” to Silverman’s “masculinity in crisis,” Chaudhuri boldly brings up topics that in today’s dominant fiction world are taboo. She examines how the feminist debate has evolved and not shifted or backpedalled by